Veterinary medicine residue found in luncheon meat from China, may cause swelling face, mouth and tongue

Health

Luncheon meat is a common food we can find in many households and definitely a crucial one in the global quarantine time as this canned food can be easily stored, for a long time. However, did you realized about the nutritional value and potential health risks behind it?

The Consumer Council of Hong Kong selected 25 types of luncheon meats and eight types of canned and bottled sausages in the market for a test. Antibiotics, sodium nitrite and sodium content in foods were tested and examined, including other nutritional value of the samples.

Luncheon meats, bottled and canned sausages are put to test by Hong Kong’s Consumer Council

Credit: HK01

The result showed no heavy metals, class B agonists, hormones and other contaminants detected in all samples, except one – the luncheon meat.

The Consumer Council found out that luncheon meat not only contains veterinary medicine residue, but many of them are high in sodium content and high in fat.

In the test made on Ma Ling luncheon meat from China, it was found out that the canned meat contains sulfamethazine – a sulfonamide antibiotic used in the livestock industry. It is also used to treat bacterial infections in humans.

Ma Ling luncheon meat not only contains veterinary medicine residue but also high in sodium.

Credit: Coconuts

According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), sulfamethazine is not classified as a carcinogen to humans, but one should be mindful of the intake as some people might show allergic reactions such as swelling face, mouth and tongue after consumption.

The chairman of the Consumer Council’s Research and Experimental Group, Professor Wong Kam-fai, reminded the public to observe a balanced diet and eat less processed meat.

Credit: HK01

Professor Wong said that we should eat more fruits and vegetables after eating a lot of processed meat to help reduce the risk of health issues such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

The chairman of the Consumer Council’s Research and Experimental Group, Professor Wong Kam-fai

Credit: The Epoch Times