The Irwin siblings have rescued over 90000 wildlife animals affected by the record-breaking Australian bushfires

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Bushfires are pretty common in Australia considering its location and annual hot weather. However, one particular phenomenon that started four months ago in September has become the largest ever bushfire to hit the history of the land down under.

Till date, the blazing hot flames had engulfed a total of 6.3 million hectares of land which include forests, parks, bushes and even a number of residential areas. 130 bushfires are still very actively spreading out, and had wiped out more than 500 million wildlife and animals that are native to Australia.

The governments and organizations from countries worldwide have come forth to channel donations and funds to help the people and animals of Australia get through the devastating times. Adding to the list of aid-providing parties are the world-renown Irwin family.

After Steve Irwin’s passing, his legacy was taken over  by his children Bindi and Robert Irwin. They run a wildlife conservation that houses many exotic and endangered wildlife, providing them with care and treatment. The record-breaking phenomenon had caused people to wonder if the Irwins and the conservation center were also impacted.

Just in time, Bindi Irwin took it to her social media page to send a message to everyone regarding their current status.

“With so many devastating fires within Australia, my heart breaks for the people and wildlife who have lost so much. I wanted to let you know that we are SAFE. There are no fires near us or our conservation properties she,” the 21-year-old wrote on her Instagram.

She proceeded to explain how the wildlife hospital at the Australia Zoo is constantly on their feet as they have to attend to injured animals rescued from bushfires every minute of the day.

“My parents dedicated our Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital to my beautiful grandmother. We will continue to honor her by being Wildlife Warriors and saving as many lives as we can,” her statement included.

She followed up with another post, sharing the image of a possum with burns all over its small body. It was called Blossom, and despite the immediate and thorough treatments done on her, the little animal died shortly after. The inspiring conservationist expressed her gratitude to all those who had been working harder than ever to rescue these battered animals. 

 

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Blossom the possum was admitted to the #AustraliaZoo Wildlife Hospital after being caught in one of the bushfires burning in other parts of Queensland. We have such an incredible team who work day and night to protect gorgeous animals like Blossom. Devastatingly this beautiful girl didn’t make it even after working so hard to save her life. I want to thank you for your kind words and support. This is the heart-wrenching truth, every day is a battle to stand up and speak for those who cannot speak for themselves. Now more than ever we need to work together to make a difference and protect our Mother Earth. For more on how you can become a Wildlife Warrior visit www.wildlifewarriors.org 💙🙏🏼

A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin) on

“We have such an incredible team who work day and night to protect gorgeous animals like Blossom. Devastatingly this beautiful girl didn’t make it even after working so hard to save her life. I want to thank you for your kind words and support. This is the heart-wrenching truth, every day is a battle to stand up and speak for those who cannot speak for themselves.”

Together with her brother Robert, they have tended to over 90 ooo animals affected by the bushfires, including bats and grey-headed foxes by the hundreds.

 

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Khaki crew! Love you @robertirwinphotography!

A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin) on

In addition to the incredible work they are doing, the siblings encouraged the public to make donations to Wildlife Warriors, the zoo’s conservation project-funding source.

According to CBS News, at least 25 people have been killed in the bushfires and many towns have perished into ashes with no traces left. Enviromentalists have speculated that with half a billion animals already wiped out, the remaining would most likely die of starvation and loss of habitat if not given immediate attention.

The rain that has poured down a couple of weeks ago had managed to slow down the raging fires but it is  now reported to have begun to catch on quicker than before. We hope that together with the Irwins, the public and otehr authorities will continue aiding the efforts to end this dreadful disaster.